Articles/Information, Movements and Organizations, Personal Experiences

Dr. Darren Ranco on Climate Change.

This week I met with Dr. Darren Ranco of the University of Maine to talk about Climate Change and the People’s Climate March and its effects for indigenous people on a global scale. Check it out below!

The following is the transcript of the audio file:

DARREN RANCO ON CLIMATE CHANGE

FOR CENTURIES NATIVE AMERICANS HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR APPRECIATION AND CONSERVATION OF THE EARTH AS WELL AS ITS RESOURCES.

IN THE MORE RECENT FIFTY YEARS, MANY PROTESTS INVOLVING LAND AND RESOURCE ABUSE HAS TAKEN THE FOREFRONT IN MANY INDIGENOUS DEBATES REGARDING A SENSE OF COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY.

JUST IN SEPTEMBER INDIGENOUS PEOPLE FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE WERE LEADING ACTIVISTS IN THE PEOPLE’S CLIMATE MARCH HELD IN NEW YORK CITY. THE MARCH WAS DESIGNED TO SHOW THE WORLD WIDE CONCERN OF MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN LIGHT OF THE UNITED NATIONS SUMMIT.

DARREN RANCO, A MEMBER OF THE PENOBSCOT NATION, CHAIR OF NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE WEIGHS IN…

(SOT) RANCO: A LOT OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S PHILOSOPHIES THAT ARE ABOUT SELF DETERMINATION AND SOVEREIGNTY FROM A CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE THAT TEACHES, NOT RIGHTS BUT RESPONSIBILITIES TO YOURSELF, YOUR ENVIRONMENT, YOUR FAMILY, YOUR CLAN, YOUR COMMUNITY. AND I THINK THAT, THAT APPROACH IS A GREAT ARTICULATION. THAT’S WHY YOU SAW SO MANY PEOPLE THERE, PEOPLE WHO ARE, NOT TYPICAL COMMUNITY MEMBERS BUT PEOPLE WHO ARE REALLY REPRESENTING THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE ACTIVISTS THAT ARE OUT THERE WORKING ON CLIMATE ISSUES AND CLIMATE JUSTICE IN PARTICULAR.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLE HAVE BEEN KNOWN TO SET A STANDARD FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD IN THEIR POLICY-MAKING AND DESIRE FOR A MORE TRADITIONAL APPROACH.

(SOT) RANCO: INDIGENOUS PEOPLE MORE SO THAN OTHERS WHO ARE CAUGHT UP IN THE POLITICS AND CITIZENSHIP OF A LOT OF SETTLER NATION-STATES, A LOT OF COLONIAL/NEOCOLONIAL STATES THAT BY BEING COMMITTED TO PLACE AND YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO PLACES, PUTS INDIGENOUS PEOPLE REALLY AT THE CENTER OF PROTECTING THE EARTH. BECAUSE IF YOU’RE COMMITTED TO AND YOUR IDENTITY IS DETERMINED BY A PLACE, A REALLY SPECIFIC PLACE IN THE WORLD, I THINK THAT SENSE OF PROTECTION AND RESPONSIBILITY TO THAT PLACE IS WHAT WOULD REALLY DEFINE A MOVEMENT.

RANCO ALSO BELIEVES THAT THE FUTURE OF THE CLIMATE CHANGE MOVEMENT IS DEFINED AS A RE-COMMITMENT TO PLURALISTIC AND SELF-DETERMINED POLITICS. HE SAYS, THERE NEEDS TO BE ACTION.

(SOT) RANCO: JUST VOTING IS PROBABLY NEVER GOING TO BE ENOUGH.

RANCO ALSO ADDED THAT STUDENTS AND YOUTH MUST TAKE THE INITIATIVE BY CONNECTING THEMSELVES TO THEIR COMMUNITY. RANCO ADVISES THAT YOUTH SHOULD BECOME AWARE OF THEIR FOOD SOURCES, AND WASTE ISSUES TO BETTER UNDERSTAND SUSTAINABILITY.

(SOT) RANCO: BASIC THINGS OF LIFE, IF YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOUR FOOD IS COMING FROM OR WHEN YOU THROW SOMETHING AWAY AND WHERE THAT’S GOING, YOU’RE REALLY DISCONNECTED FROM THE WORLD AROUND YOU.

RANCO FEELS THAT MAINTAINING YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE WORLD AND CONNECTING WITH PEOPLE THROUGH SOCIAL NETWORKS ABOUT EACH OTHER’S ENVIRONMENT IS INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT

(SOT) RANCO: IF YOU THINK THAT EDUCATION IS NOT JUST A BUNCH OF FACTS BUT ACTUALLY A SERIES OF RELATIONSHIPS, WHICH I ACTUALLY DO, THEN I THINK YOUR COMMITMENT TO THESE RELATIONSHIPS IN TERMS OF YOUR EDUCATION WOULD CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABILITY.

TO LEARN MORE, DR. DARREN RANCO IS SCHEDULED TO TEACH A COURSE DURING THE 2015 SPRING SEMESTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE TITLED AMERICAN INDIANS AND CLIMATE CHANGE. THE COURSE WILL DISCUSS THE LIFECYCLE, SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPARE TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE WITH WESTERN SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE WHILE EXPLORING THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF EACH SYSTEM.

I AM CHARLOTTE ROE, AND THIS IS NDN IMPACT.

Advertisements
Articles/Information, Movements and Organizations

People’s Climate March

Today marked the largest march for climate change in the history of the world in New York City. The march represents the public’s desire to get global leaders involved in protecting the environment and providing information on creating a more peaceful and sustainable world economy.

More than 300, 000 people were in attendance at the climate march today, including Native rapper and activist Frank Waln, the 1491’s, and Idle No More. Thousands of other natives and Indigenous people from around the world gathered in similar areas in Manhattan to march together as Indigenous people in support of the environment. Celebrities seen with indigenous groups included Mark Ruffalo and Leonardo DiCaprio to provide more interest and support in the worldwide event. DiCaprio was seen holding the sign alongside Native American activist in support shutting down the Tar Sands, Keystone XL Pipeline and the respect of indigenous peoples’ treaty rights.

For some other communities within the country, the climate change protest is bringing attention to the polluted air, and water quality as well as unsafe areas for children in their area that so many politicians have neglected.

Others is to reflect on the state of the economy and its growing inequality rate forcing citizens out of their homes and into unhealthy quality of life styles.

The march was lined up to show steps and provide messages to the spectating public. The line up was as follows:

People's Climate March Line Up
People’s Climate March Line Up

Having indigenous people in the front line allows the American public to realize that Native people are still fully involved in the future of their homelands and are not invisible.

Throughout the country, and the world indigenous people who were unable to attend the summit posted photographs, articles and ideas about climate change on all forms of social media and the internet.

The final point of the summit was to show the unity of the people of world for the care of the earth and its future. Those involved and in support are looking for more leadership in all forms of government for public outreach in education, development, and prosperity in the name of the Earth’s.

The People’s Climate March’s affect will not last just this one day but will resonate for years to come and in the minds of the many UN delegates that will be gathering for a climate change discussion this week.

For Indigenous people the schedule for the rest of the summit continues at 9am with the Flood Wall Street Action, followed by the Climate Action Week: CO2lonialism and Climate Justice: An Indigenous Worldview at The Auditorium at 6:30pm at 66 West 12th Street in Manhattan. On Tuesday the Peoples Climate Justice Tribunal will be held at 10am at the Church Center for the United Nations in Midtown Manhattan. Concluding on Wednesday with a press conference at 11am at the American Indian Community House at 254 W. 29th St. 2nd Floor (8th Ave.).